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#startup: Des Sea Bubbles, une voiture taxi qui va voler au-dessus de la Seine à Paris en 2017 (En/Fr)


  • Venice may have the gondola, but Paris will soon have its own water-based transport fit for the future.

Sea Bubbles are futuristic pods that float on stilts 2ft above the water and can travel up to 30km/h. There are the creation of French yachtsman Alain Thébault and Swedish windsurfer Anders Bringdal and are due to be tried out in the French capital next spring at the request of the environmentally conscious city hall.

Sea Bubbles may help reduce Paris’s road traffic problem. There are a sort of “funny” electic boats held to a standard of “zero emissions, zero waves and zero noise” which rise above the water ensured and performed by the four thin wing structure which remains in contact with the water while moving. Thanks to Thébault’s Hydroptère technology, when the service transports passengers across the water, the vehicle won’t float on the surface like a boat. 

 

The brainchild of French yachtsman Alain Thébault and Swedish windsurfer Anders Bringdal, the first five prototypes of the Sea Bubbles will arrive on the Seine in 2017, pitched as an environmentally-friendly alternative for commuters.

If the vessels are granted licences to ply their trade on the Seine, the plan is to build specially designed docking stations where passengers can hop on or off and which would also serve as charging stations.

Sea Bubble’s intention, after Paris launch is to spread this mode of transport to cities around the world as New York, Hong-Kong, London or Miami.

 

Sources, The Telegraph, Huff Post (en/fr), BfmTv.fr, the Mirror, Sea Bubbles site

Credit Photo: @SeaBubbles-Alain Thébault

 

 

#Innovation and #start-ups: Used Coffee Grounds Turned Into A Renewable Energy Source


Coffee is one of the globe’s largest agricultural commodities, with about 8bn kilograms (more than 16bn lbs) grown annually worldwide. That’s a lot of coffee – and a lot of leftover coffee grounds, most of which ends up in landfills or, in a best-case scenario, as a soil conditioner in someone’s garden.
Soluble coffee has been reported as a richsource of antioxidants, the consumption of which may prevent diseases caused by oxidative damage.Through a little bit of research the founder of Bio-Bean, Arthur Kay ,taught that coffee has a higher caloric value than wood.  figured out how to compress the grounds into bio-fuel pellets.
As it has been reported on the Guardian, companies such as Starbucks and Nestle, for example, are already putting used coffee grounds to work, while researchers believe that oil from coffee grounds could end up contributing tens of millions of liters of biodiesel to the global fuel supply.

UK-based clean tech company bio-bean has industrialized the process of turning used coffee grounds into sustainable biofuels and biochemicals. Bio-bean works within the existing energy and waste infrastructure to develop products and solutions that displace conventional fuels and chemicals.

The Telegraph reports that Bio-Bean has contracts to collect used coffee grounds from cafes, coffee factories, and airports, all of whom are saving a pretty penny in disposal fees (£154 per ton, around $225). Before being turned into biofuel, the coffee refuse is stripped of the oils in order to keep the bricks from smelling like coffee when burned. “Some people think this is a shame but others don’t want their home to smell like Starbucks,” Kay states.

Bio-Bean, now three year old company,  reprocesses about 10% of all the coffee grounds in the UK — about 50,000 tons — into pellets every year. That’s enough to heat about 15,000 homes according to its founder. The company produces biomass pellets and recently introduced Coffee Logs, carbon neutral biomass briquettes that can fuel homes and appliances, such as wood-fire stoves and BBQs. It has also undertaken extensive research and development into the commercial application of biodiesel from waste coffee grounds.

Bio-bean sells its carbon-neutral clean fuel to local businesses and aims to eventually help power the same coffee shops that supplied the grounds.

coffee beans biodiesel

In Joure, in the Netherlands, Veolia and Douwe Egberts Master Blenders have developed a solution for reusing coffee grounds to produce steam, and thus reduce the coffee company’s consumption of natural gas.

Veolia engineers set out to meet this challenge by developing a combustion system unlike any other in the world, in which the spent coffee grounds from the production process are burned to generate the steam needed to operate the plant. The system has enabled the plant to reduce its CO2 emissions by 70%.

Sources: Bio-bean,the Guardian, Telegraph UK.

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Featured Image Credit: @Wikipedia

coffee
credit:@ Pixabay

Français:

Grâce à une technologie proche de celle qui permet aux industriels du sucre de produire du biocarburant, Bio-Bean est capable de transformer les restes de café en un produit capable de propulser les voitures équipées de moteurs adaptés. Mais la production de ce nouveau carburant laisse à son tour des déchets « solides », pour lesquels notre entreprise britannique a également une solution : compactés, ils sont transformés en granulés pour le chauffage.

Pour l’instant, la société basée à Londres centre son activité sur la capitale anglaise et se permet même le luxe de produire local, et donc de limiter les émissions de CO2 de son activité.

Pour cela, il a fixé aux habitants et aux industriels locaux des objectifs ambitieux en terme de déchets (70% d’entre eux devront être réutilisés, recyclés ou compostés d’ici 2020) et d’émissions de CO2 (60% d’émissions en moins d’ici 2025).