Tag Archives: problème chypriote

Euronews: CYPRUS: DISPLACED PEOPLE AND REUNIFICATION OF A DIVIDED ISLAND// CHYPRE : LA RÉUNIFICATION IMPOSSIBLE ?


Cyprus has been split on ethnic lines since 1974, when Turkish troops invaded the north of the island in response to a short-lived coup by Greek Cypriot militants seeking union with Greece.

In recent months Greek and Turkish Cypriots have been negotiating to try to end their decades-long conflict and have asked the United Nations to prepare for a new peace conference in early March.

A UN envoy is now urging both sides to seize an opportunity for peace, warning it could be years before such a chance arises again.

Euronews Insiders visited the divided island to speak with Cypriot people on both sides of the divide.

In 1974, fighting pushed Greek Cypriots from Morphou to the south. Turkish Cypriots fled to the north. The conflict displaced tens of thousands of Cypriots including the Kandulu family. The abandoned houses were distributed through a kind of lottery system.

Checkpoints opened in 2003 allowing access between the two sides through a UN-patrolled buffer zone.

read more on euronews.com

Français:

En 1974, les combats ont poussé les Chypriotes grecs de Morphou vers le sud tandis que les Chypriotes turcs ont fui au nord. Résultat : des dizaines de milliers de personnes déplacées comme les Kandulu. Dans la région de Morphou, les maisons abandonnées par les Chypriotes grecs ont été attribuées par tirage au sort aux milliers de familles de réfugiés chypriotes turcs venus du sud.

Vidéo en français sur le site Euronews

À Chypre, près de Morphou, dans la partie nord de cette île divisée, nous nous rendons sur des parcelles d’orangers. Celles-ci s‘étendent à perte de vue dans la région. Sur place, on parle turc. Dans le sud du territoire, on parle grec. Les négociations en vue d’une réunification se sont intensifiées ces derniers mois même si en janvier, une conférence sous l‘égide de l’ONU n’avait abouti à aucune avancée concrète.

La partition de l‘île n’a rien d’immuable. Au sud, dans le village de Kiti, un couple en est la preuve vivante. Ces musiciens – l’un chypriote grec, l’autre chypriote turque – viennent d’avoir un enfant. Arion grandira-t-il dans une Chypre réunifiée dont la nouvelle conférence internationale prévue en mars pourrait être l‘étape décisive ?

chypre carte

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Independent Opinion-Analysis: The collapse of the negotiations in Cyprus, the US threats and the background role of Russia and Greece


Original Source: Dances with Bears  of John Helmer

In the dark of Monday night before light broke on Tuesday, Cyprus, the small Mediterranean island invaded and occupied for 42 years  by Turkish troops with US and UK backing,  began a revolution its president, Nicos Anastasiades ,  doesn’t want.

The collapse of negotiations between the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities, arranged by United Nations (UN) officials at the Swiss resort of Mont Pèlerin, was confirmed by a UN communique issued at 1:30 in the morning. “They have not been able to achieve the necessary further convergences on criteria for territorial adjustment that would have paved the way for the last phase of the talks,” the bulletin announced.  “The two sides have decided to return to Cyprus and reflect on the way forward.”

“The Americans, the Turks, the European Union, and the British were sure there’s no deal  Anastasiades could not be persuaded to accept,” said a senior Cyprus official,  now retired,  “so long as there’s  a large enough percentage in it for himself. Anastasiades’s weakness is his personal corruption. This time, though, the Turks raised their bid too high. The Americans lost their cards in their election on November 8. The British aren’t players in Europe now. And for the first time there was a display of Greek and Russian power which has changed the game entirely. Greece first, then Russia have cut the legs off the negotiating table – Anastasiades’s legs too.” Continue reading Independent Opinion-Analysis: The collapse of the negotiations in Cyprus, the US threats and the background role of Russia and Greece